MoivePass Patent Contains Broad Claims That Span Well Beyond Theaters

MoviePass owns an incredibly valuable Patent (US Patent # 9135578) with wide ranging claims that span well beyond the theater industry.   In this post I will try to cover some of the key language in the Patent, how it protects MoviePass from potential competitors like Sinemia who MoviePass is currently actively litigating for Patent infringement.

There is a LOT of technical mumbo jumbo in all Patent applications, and Patent Law is extremely complicated.  I am not a Patent Lawyer, I don’t play one on TV either.   I have had quite a bit of experience with Patents – I have invested and led companies who had important Patent claims worth millions of dollars.  I have also served as a key witness in a very large Patent infringement case for Microsoft.  Unfortunately, we were the defendant in that case, we settled, for a LOT of money, even for Microsoft it was a lot of money.  I spend weeks on the case and I saw first-hand how valuable and important a good patent can be.

The most important part of a Patent is what is claimed, and if those claims can be adequately protected.   Again, I am not a lawyer, but have some experience in these matters.  After fully reading through the MoviePass patent it is my opinion the claims are sufficiently specific and broad enough to protect MoviePass from competitors offering a copycat service.  Further the claims issued cover many different potential future products that may or may not be developed or marketed by MoviePass.    Below you can read the full specific claims directly from the Patent.   Just for a  highlight here is one of the more potentially valuable claims made in the patent.

(A ticketing system comprising: a plurality of databases coupled via a network; a plurality of processors coupled to the plurality of databases; a plurality of electronic scanning devices coupled via the network wherein each of the electronic scanning devices is associated with a venue;) 

Now that is a lot of lingo.  But it is VERY important.  This essentially gives MoviePass a claim to connecting a cloud service ticketing system to a credit or debit card.  This is a very broad claim.  Think if Ticketmaster, Stubhub or any other number of ticketing companies wanted to deliver a similar method ticketing and transaction.  They would have to negotiate with MoviePass or risk violating this clear claim.   This alone could be worth many many 10’s millions of dollars over time.

The claims go on to cover a wide variety of features and application uses for the MoviePass invention and transaction system.   Claims include the activation of the subscription from a mobile device, to the activation of the credit/debit card, the location based check in, the clever way that MoviePass clears the transaction with the merchant for a specific predefined amount, and more.   I have read a lot of patents, and helped apply for many.  It is unusual to receive such a wide claim so clearly documented.  I have to believe that MoviePass had some very clever lawyers and made a very significant investment to obtain this patent.

To give you an idea of how potentially valuable a patent can be consider the patent settlement between Google and Yahoo! where Google had violated a search patent that had been obtained by Yahoo! when they had purchased Overture.  Overture was the originator of paid search, and the patent settlement was considered so important and valuable it was actually holding up Google’s ability to IPO back in 2004.  Google settled by giving 2.7 Million Shares to Yahoo – valued at about $300 Million.  It was a stroke of luck for Yahoo!  and that investment quickly skyrocketed above $2 Billion.   Yes, patents are very valuable!

You can also learn a lot about what a company may be planning and thinking by looking at patents.  Here are a few art exhibits from the MoviePass patent that show some feature ideas we have not yet seen in the app.  Some of which would be clearly valuable for marketing purposes.  And others that will help MoviePass create more commerce with the app.

Here you can see how MoviePass could make a simple change to limit consumption by only allowing a user to see a particular movie one time.

Here you see how MoviePass could market a DVD directly from the MP App.

Here you see a clever way for MoviePass to integrate with Facebook, allowing for a more social experience, and spreading the word of MoviePass

 

Here is an additional view of inviting friends to MoviePass.  A powerful marketing tool.

In summary, MoviePass has a very valuable patent, which it is already seeking to defend vs. competitors.  The claims from the patent are surprisingly broad and apply beyond just going to the movies.  This creates a strong moat for the MoviePass business by protecting the MoviePass experience from easy copycat competitors.   Finally, you can see that MoviePass has a lot more cool ideas on the back burner that will improve the service and create new revenue opportunities for the company.

 

 

The full language of the claims from the patent are here:

What is claimed is:

1. A ticketing system comprising: a plurality of databases coupled via a network; a plurality of processors coupled to the plurality of databases; a plurality of electronic scanning devices coupled via the network wherein each of the electronic scanning devices is associated with a venue; and at least one user device coupled to the processors and the databases via the network, wherein the at least one user device comprises at least one of a smart phone, a handheld mobile device with communication capability, and a personal computer; wherein the plurality of processors are configured to, via the network, register a subscriber-user for a subscription in exchange for a subscription fee, wherein the subscription comprises a predetermined number of events in a time period, wherein the subscriber-user is associated with the at least one user device; via the network, from the at least one user device, receive a subscriber-user request to book a ticket for an event; determine that the subscription is current; determine a venue and a time for the event; communicate with the venue to reserve the requested ticket booking; associate a pre-paid credit card with the subscriber-user, wherein the pre-paid credit card is associated with an account; automatically detect, in real time, a location of the at least one user device at the determined venue to determine that the subscriber-user is at the determined venue; immediately fund the account with sufficient funds to pay for the requested ticket only if the location of the at least one user device is detected at the determined venue; determine, a predetermined time after funding the account, whether the sufficient funds remain in the account; detect a physical location of a scanning device via the network when one of the plurality of scanning devices is used to scan the pre-paid credit card; and collect and store data related to the subscriber-user in the databases, wherein the data comprises names of events attended by the subscriber-user, venues of the events attended by the subscriber-user, types of events attended by the subscriber-user, times of day of attendance by the subscriber-user, and frequency of attendance by the subscriber-user, and wherein collecting data comprises automatically receiving the data via the network.

2. A computer-implemented method for targeted selling, comprising: a processor via a network registering a subscriber-user for a subscription in exchange for a subscription fee, wherein the subscription comprises a predetermined number of events in a time period, wherein the subscriber-user is associated with at least one communication device; the processor communicating with a financial institution to set up a subscriber-user account for funding ticket purchases; the processor receiving and storing subscriber-user data comprising a name, an age, a gender, a home address, an email address, a phone number, product preferences, and names of friends in a database coupled to the processor; the processor receiving a request from the at least one communication device of the subscriber-user to book a ticket for an event; the processor determining a time for the event and a venue for the event; the processor communicating via a network with a venue system to reserve a ticket for the event; the processor sending the subscriber-user a ticket token to the at least one communication device, wherein the ticket token is scannable from the at least one communication device at the venue to give the subscriber-user access to the event; the processor automatically detecting, in real time, a location of the at least one communication device at the venue to determine that the subscriber-user is at the venue; the processor immediately funding the subscriber-user account with sufficient funds to pay for the requested ticket only if the location of the at least one communication device is detected at the venue; the processor determining, a predetermined time after funding the subscriber-user account, whether the sufficient funds remain in the subscriber-user account; after the end of the event, the processor detecting whether the ticket token was redeemed, comprising determining via a network whether the subscriber-user account has been debited for a price of the ticket; if the ticket token was redeemed, the processor collecting event data, including a time of the event, a type of the event, a name of the event, and a location of the venue, wherein collecting comprises collecting scanned electronic data from scanning the ticket token; the processor associating the event data with the subscriber-user data; and the processor storing the event data in the database.

3. The method of claim 2, wherein detecting whether the ticket token was redeemed further comprises, if the ticket token was not redeemed, the processor allowing the subscriber-user to request to book another ticket for the same event.

4. The method of claim 2, further wherein detecting whether the ticket token was redeemed further comprises, if the ticket token was redeemed, the processor disallowing the subscriber-user to request to book another ticket for the same event.

5. The method of claim 2, further comprising: the processor sending the subscriber-user an electronic message inviting the subscriber-user to associate via a social networking site to become a networked subscriber-user; the processor providing a networked subscriber-user a facility to invite friends to an event via the social networking site; the processor receiving a list of friends invited to the event by the networked subscriber-user; the processor collecting friend data regarding invited friends of the subscriber-user, comprising which friends accepted invitations, and which friends are also subscriber-users; the processor associating the friend data with the subscriber-user data; the processor storing the friend data in the database.

6. The method of claim 5, further comprising the processor generating data reports from the subscriber-user data, the event data, and the friend data.

7. The method of claim 2, further comprising the processor allowing the subscriber-user to book a predetermined number of events over a predetermined time period for a fixed price.

8. The method of claim 7, further comprising the processor tracking a number of events booked in the time period and disallowing requests to book events over the predetermined number of events over the predetermined time period.

9. The method of claim 2, further comprising, after the event is scheduled to be over, the processor sending an electronic message to the subscriber-user with a request to review the event.

10. The method of claim 2, further comprising, after the event is scheduled to be over, the processor sending an electronic message to the subscriber-user with at least one offer to purchase items related to the event.


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