MoviePass is Crossing the Chasm Into the Tornado – We’re Dancing Man

As long-term investors in HMNYwe feel like we are dancing alone this week.  We have been rejected by the market, we are embarrassed, alone, we feel like maybe it would be less humiliating to just sit down, or leave the concert altogether.  This is the hard life for startups and their investors.   Being an innovator can be very lonely, sticking to an idea when everyone else is running away or rejecting you is one of the hardest things an investor can do.  People, humans, are animals, they run in herds.

Please take a couple minutes to watch and listen to Geoffrey Moore the originator of Crossing the Chasm walk you through this incredible example of “Dancing Man” from  2009 Sasquatch.  It is a fun video and it explains the phenomena of Crossing the Chasm better than a thousand more words here ever could.

I believe that MoviePass is now at the very scary and most critical juncture for a startup company, it is attempting to cross the chasm from Early Adopters to Early Majority.

Crossing the Chasm

 

All the signs of MoviePass attempting to cross the chasm are emerging at the same time.

  • Early Adopters are already in!  They love the service.  An incredible 83% of MP early adopters say they would recommend it to a friend.  The classic WOM* has been achieved.
    • The percentages neatly mirror the adoption lifecycle.  MoviePass is buying approximately 9-10% of Movie Tickets – matching the early adopter segment perfectly.
    • Mitch has stated consistently that the magic numbers needed to achieve profitability are 5 Million Subscribers and around 20% of tickets purchased.  I am sure Mitch knows these numbers land him just on the other side of the chasm, where the early majority adopts the service, and a new category is fully established.
  • Investors are losing their shit!   Investors, venture capital, always get very nervous at this point in the lifecycle, and this is why HMNY is getting killed in the market.  VC’s and Wall Street guys are big on vision early, and the freak out when it takes just a little more money or time to get to that vision.  They get impatient, they literally freak out, they demand their money back, they look to change management (which BTW has already happened at MoviePass), the give up.  I have seen it many times in other investments, crossing that chasm takes vision and balls that most investors seem to lack.
  • The media is freaking out!  This stage is where a lot of good ideas – (but weak companies) with strong early momentum with the early adopters often die.  As such it is understandable that the vultures of the media who love a good car crash and scary death spiral story are seizing the moment to create some clickbait headlines.  All of this should be expected right now.

I believe that MoviePass will cross the big scary chasm and live on as a big successful game-changing company.   I have not lost faith.  Here’s why.

  • Bankruptcy Looks Unlikely – No Debt Lots of levers
  • Product Changes to adapt to Early Majority customers are now baked into the product.   The incredible PR and WOM derived from the too good to be true offer has done the heavy lifting in for Early Adopter phase.  Limiting to a single view of any title and reducing fraud with ticket stubs are now in and reducing costs.
  • Lack of competition.  MoviePass has an incredible lead over any competition, and it’s is now extremely unlikely any more new entrants will come into this space.  Yes, there is that Turkish company, but they look like a Bing vs. a Google.  No brand there, the offer is weak, and can’t catch up.
  • The entrenched establishment now looks shaky and scared.  AMC lashing out at MoviePass and subsequently seeing their stock tank after an earnings beat – infused from MoviePass is all you need to see to know that MoviePass has the establishment wondering what the hell they can do now to stop this thing.   Again this is a classic crossing the chasm point, where the entrenched competitors realize they have to make some kind of move.  I think it is too late for AMC, they will have to acquiesce.
  •  I have a gut feeling Early Majority has already started.   As I have written about many times in the past, at my local theater the employees I talk with estimate that MoviePass is making up around 30% of tickets sold.   These are kids, who don’t have all the data, but they see people coming in every day, and they know the trend.  These kids say they are seeing the demographics change to more “normal” people, not just movie fans.  That my friends is the beginning of crossing to the Early Majority!   This is a hard one to put a finger on, pure data can lie to you when trying to figure out if the cross to Early Majority is underway.  Truly it is a gut feeling tied to data that tells you when that transition is underway.  The kids working at the theater are feeling it!

So what should investors in MoviePass do now?

Well,  first of all, I have learned one big lesson, don’t take my advice for timing, so far my advice on timing has been terrible, and for that, I truly apologize.  Mark Gomes got the timing so much better than me, if you are a trader looking for a quick turn, I would yield to him on timing calls, he has nailed it – so far!     I hate losing money, and I hate it when friends, readers, and others lose money.  So far, I have not lost money because I have not sold a single share, but man do I wish I would have listened to Mark about my entry point for this stock.  Calling tops and bottoms is really hard, and I missed here.

With that govelling out of the way.  My advice to those who are already in the stock, I think you should on and see if MoviePass can indeed Cross the Chasm, if they do, you will be richly rewarded.

If you have not read Geoffry Moore’s Crossing the Chasm, I highly recommend reading it – it is a classic and one I think all serious investors and entrepreneurs should read and understand.

I also highly recommend “Inside the Tornado”, which adapts Moore’s original works to be more relevant to B2C disruptors like MoviePass.

*Word of Mouth 

Why Did HMNY (MoviePass) File That Alarming 8K?

We all now know that HMNY filed an 8K that set off alarm bells, causing a media panic claiming MP was close to running out of cash, sinking the stock 60% in two days.

The specific statement read.

As of April 30, 2018, we had approximately $15.5 million in available cash and approximately $27.9 million on deposit with our merchant processors for a total of approximately $43.4 million. The funds held by our merchant processors represent a portion of the payments received for annual and other extended term MoviePass subscription plans, which we classify as accounts receivable on our balance sheet and which we expect to be disbursed to us during the course of 2018. We believe that our average cash deficit has been approximately $21.7 million per month from September 30, 2017 to April 30, 2018. By the end of April 2018, we implemented certain measures to promote the fair use of our MoviePass subscription product, which we believe should reduce our monthly cash deficit significantly. These measures include a technological enhancement which prevents MoviePass subscribers from sharing their accounts with non-subscribers and allowing subscribers to see a movie title only once per subscriber using the MoviePass subscription. We believe these measures enabled us to reduce our cash deficit during the first week of May 2018 by more than 35%. In addition, by returning to our $9.95 per month unlimited MoviePass subscription, enabling subscribers to see up to one new movie title per day, we believe our subscriber acquisitions and subscription revenues will continue to increase for the foreseeable future. However, we will need proceeds from sales of our common stock pursuant to our Equity Distribution Agreement with Canaccord Genuity, or other sources of capital, starting in May 2018. Further, if we use all or a portion of the anticipated net proceeds from sales of our common stock pursuant to our Equity Distribution Agreement with Canaccord Genuity for acquisitions of other companies or financial interests in additional movies (through our subsidiary, MoviePass Ventures), we will need additional capital to offset our monthly cash deficit. In 2018, we expect our cash deficit from month to month will vary significantly based on the amount of movie tickets MoviePass is required to purchase for its subscribers during the month, the amount we spend on acquiring financial interests in additional movies through MoviePass Ventures, the amount we may spend on any other types of acquisitions, and our ability to develop the MoviePass business model in the near term generally, including developing and growing sources of revenue other than subscription revenue. Because the length of time and costs associated with the development of the MoviePass and MoviePass Ventures business model is highly uncertain, we are unable to estimate the actual funds we will require. If we are unable to obtain sufficient amounts of additional capital, whether through our Equity Distribution Agreement or otherwise, we may be required to reduce the scope of our planned growth or otherwise alter our business model, objectives and operations, which could harm our business, financial condition and operating results.

But many of us could not figure out WHY the company came out with this statement, and why NOW?!  There was very little new news in the statement.   If you break it down, the company said they will need to raise more cash, which they have already said they had planned to do by selling shares, and they said they would do this as they needed the funds.  So that was nothing new.   The cash burn level reported was also not new news.  Mitch and Ted have both said that they were burning in the $20M a month range in several previous interviews.   The statement also said that management had taken steps to reduce COGS, and that by adding the limitation of only seeing a title one time, and enforcing photos of ticket stubs, had reduced usage and fraud, helping to bring usage down more than 35%.   This was great news, but it had also been mentioned in prior interviews earlier in the week.  Nothing really new again!

So why then did HMNY – MoviePass -feel the need to release this 8K at all?   I have researched this, and the answer is that this is a requirement that they must fulfill by SEC regulation based on that fact that they are operating under a “going concern” audit finding.    The going concern part of this is nothing new.  In fact, it has been known for some time now.   What most investors do not realize is that once you have this finding attached to your company, the disclosure rules for the company change.

This is a complicated bit of accounting rules and regulations and if you want all the details you can read them here.  But the cliff notes version is that any updates both positive and negative that could significantly impact the “going concern” status of the company must be announced as they occur.    So the changes to MoviePass to reduce cash burn had to be disclosed.  And with those changes, the change to the cash position, and the intention to stick to the plan of raising more money with additional stock, also had to be disclosed.  Regardless of the fact that both of these things were already known by investors who were closely following the company.

To put a fine point on it – new developments that are POSITIVE – that will help reduce the “going-concern” issue with the company, must be disclosed.

Specifically —-

“The going-concern standard explains that these disclosures may change over time as new information becomes available and that disclosure of how the substantial doubt was resolved is required in the period in which substantial doubt no longer exists (before or after consideration of management’s plans). In addition, the going-concern standard states that the mitigating effects of management’s plans to alleviate substantial doubt should be evaluated only if (1) the plans are approved before the financial statement issuance date and (2) dboth of the following conditions are met: a. It is probable that management’s plans will be effectively implemented within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued. b. It is probable that management’s plans, when implemented, will mitigate the relevant conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued.”

It is reasonable to believe that Mitch and Ted actually believed that the filing was routine and that there was some substantially positive news in the filing that had only been mentioned one or two times in TV interviews, and this filing would make it official that MoviePass is making great progress in moving toward a more profitable future.

Unfortunately, the 8K hit within less than 24 hours of AMC CEO Adam Aron throwing MoviePass under the bus.   Adam made a bunch of nasty and false comments on how MoviePass was certain to be in a death spiral.  And made a bunch of false assertions on usage amongst other bizarre comments.

The timing could not have been worse for HMNY to release the 8K, it set off a literal $hit storm of bad headlines, causing retail investors to panic sell the stock.

Was this bad execution on the part of HMNY?  Probably – however as SEC forms go, it takes a few days to file them and companies may not know exactly what day the form will hit the SEC website.   So maybe it was just unfortunate bad timing.

Should HMNY and MoviePass do more to stop the stock price from falling?  Maybe, but there could be other restrictions they are under for releasing information.  We are close to ER, where there is normally a quiet period prior.  Also, we don’t know what is happening with the final acquisition of MoviePass and the rebranding of HMNY to MoviePass.  Also, we don’t know what is happening with the spinoff of Zone and if there is a quiet period there.

It is actually possible that this entire episode is very much ado about nothing.  And that Mitch and Ted both have their hands tied in how much more they can really say to calm investors fear of near-term Bankruptcy.   Afterall, Farnsworth and Lowe have both stated in separate interviews that they are confident they have plenty of options for additional funding and that they at least are not worried at all about insolvency.

My conclusion, the drop was scary and shook out a lot of early shareholders and retail investors who just don’t have the stomach to take these kinds of losses, even if they are just on paper until you sell.  The series of events was a great gift to the short sellers who are paying big money to short this stock because they don’t believe in the model, or they have ulterior motives for wanting to have HMNY not be successful.

It seems unlikely that HMNY is headed for Bankruptcy anytime soon given they have virtually zero debt, and a lot of options to keep on trucking as a “going concern”.

My view – if you liked this stock at $7 or $4 or even $2 – you should love the stock NOW at .85 cents!

Nothing significant has really changed!   Go review all the video interviews I have cataloged here.   You will see that the story has been consistent, that there was really no big new news at all, and that Farnsworth and Lowe consistently have said they would need to raise more money as they built out a 5 Million user subscriber base.

Don’t let greedy Wall Street hedge funds and sneaky short attacks from competitors like AMC scare you out of what will be a great long term investment!   Hang in there, average down if you can stomach it.

As Mark Twain once said.

“The rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated”

Why I see MoviePass utilization rate staying in the 1.2 to 1.5 range

I have now received a LOT of feedback on my MoviePass revenue model published on Seeking Alpha today.  By far the biggest area of feedback has been from people who disagree (sometimes violently and rudely) with the  utilization factor I used in the model.  This is the number of times per month on average MoviePass users will see a movie.  I used 1.4 in my model.  Many people emailed me and said I was crazy, the usage will be way higher the say! Lots of people gave me anecdotal evidence about how they use MoviePass all the time and so all of their friends!    It will be at least 4 a month!  Your model is junk!  2 is the lowest it will ever go!  booo !  Hiss!!    models like Mark Gomes ramp it to over 4.   and shorts have loved that logic!

Why do people care so much?  Investors know, the Utilzation rate has a massive impact on the model and on MoviePass’ fortunes, so I wanted to revisit my assumption here and more fully explore the topic.  As if I am way off, my model will be wrong, and it would not be good for the company or my long position in HMNY.

First, it is worth noting the company has claimed it sees utilization rate settling at 1.2 average over time.  

Many have pointed out that the company had mentioned a number over 2 in SEC reports, I have not been able to find those numbers as of yet. But if somebody has a link to send me, please do!  

In the most extensive interview done yet on the MoviePass business model Mitch Lowe and recode’s Peter Kafka –  Mitch explained the usage numbers this way.

Here’s the trick: 89 percent of American moviegoers only go to four or five movies a year. When they join MoviePass, they double their consumption and go to about 10 a year. That’s a little bit less than one a month. They balance out the 11 percent of the population that go 18 times before joining MoviePass and then after go three times a month. It works out. Over time, it actually works out to be about one movie per month per subscriber. Now, some people do go to 10, 15. We even have one guy who on this 40th birthday challenged himself to go to 40 movies in 40 days. We do have people with a fair amount of time on their hands.”

So if we use these numbers form the CEO! – It would put the Utilization factor at 1!

As you all know, I am believer and a bull on MoviePass.  But even I have a hard time accepting a usage factor of 1.  It just seems too low to me. That is a gut feeling.

Another interesting source for utilization rate was posted here on reddit.

This model does an extrapolation of total movie tickets sold and the % of tickets sold by MoviePass over a 4 month period and does a calculation from there to come up with an average number of tickets per subscriber.  This model lands at around 1.3 to 1.5 Movies per month. The author comes up with a final analysis stating.

“With a TLDR: Moviepass bought at most 14,499,069 tickets from movies released between Novemember 1st – March 24th which is an average of 1.53 movies per subscriber.

A better estimate using 6% of the box office for the missing data is 12,384,621 tickets sold for an average of 1.3 tickets/month per subscriber. Most likely the average subscriber goes to 1.3-1.53 movies per month”

In my model I factored in that MoviePass has capped users with the most recent promo with iHeartRadio at 4 movies a month.  That keeps the heavy users from skewing (& screwing) up the average. MoviePass has also made some significant moves to reduce fraud and started to get more aggressive enforcing its terms of service.  In some cases discontinuing Heavy Users subscriptions.

So the hard facts we have from the Company CEO, and from other detailed models do show that my estimated 1.4 Utilization Rate is actually pretty reasonable after all.  It is higher than what the Company publicly states, and within the high range of the most detailed model I could find.

Then there is a more subjective view I think is important to consider.  

Most people simply do not have the time to see more than 16 to 17 movies a year. Which is what a 1.4 utilization rate would bring.  In reality most don’t have the time to see more than 1 movie a month.

Let’s look at some data to backup that claim.   

The Average feature film is around 90 Minutes long.  That does not include previews, ads etc. that accompany most viewings, that easily ads 15 minutes to the experience.  If you add in the commute time to the theater, I estimate 15 minutes each way for 30 minutes total commuting time you get to a total time commitment of at least 2 hours, likely more, but I will use that number to be conservative.

A 1.4 Utilization Factor or about 16 movies a year x 2 Hours equals 32 hours a year committed to movie going.  Almost an entire work week spent at the movies? I just don’t think most people have that kind of time to spare.   

We have all read the research and seen the many articles on how busy Americans are.  The work week continues to get longer, people don’t take their allotted vacation days, we live in what is now called the “busy culture”.  Not to mention there is incredible competition for our free time and lots of attractive media options when you want that media escape.   

Going to the movies typically means finding somebody else to go with you – although more people are starting to go it alone with MP.  It also means finding a show and a time that works for you, it could mean getting a babysitter, and it may mean you have to leave your warm dry house and go through inclement weather just to see a show.  There are a LOT of good reasons that people think they will go do something, and finally reality sets in and they make other plans, admit it, it happens to you all the time!

Finally, If you are reading this article – know that you are NOT normal!  You likely care about movies more than most people. That is likely why you found out about MoviePass in the first place.  You are also a subset of the population who actually cares about individual stocks. You live in a small cohort world, you are not the “average” consumer.  So if your gut – subjectively is telling you people will see a lot more than 16 movies a year. You are probably wrong, and you just don’t know it. The data doesn’t back it, nor does a longer examination of the subjective thinking on the topic.  

So with that – thank you again to all who sent feedback – some of it angry 🙂 on how stupid my model is because my Utilization rate is a fantasy!   Maybe that fantasy is actually your own….

 

Steve Jobs Predicted A MoviePass Like Service One Year Before Passing – He Saw The MoviePass Business Model

One year before Steve Jobs passed he predicted a service like HMNY’s MoviePass would change how studios market their films. Now 8+ years after the marketing genius’s death, MoviePass stands.

Now 8+ years after the marketing genius’s death, Moviepass stands to deliver on Job’s prediction that technology would allow studios to efficiently reach audiences reducing their spiraling marketing costs.

At only 10% share of Studio Marketing budgets, Moviepass could stand to reap $230M a year in revenue from Studios. 10% is a conservative estimate given the efficiency of Moviepass.

Way back in 2010 Steve Jobs predicted at an industry conference a change from technology would emerge that would fundamentally change the way movie studios go to market and connect with their customers. His prediction was early, but is now being delivered via MoviePass.

Jobs stated “What the studios need to do is start embracing the front end of the business,” he said, “to start knowing who their customers are, and to start building mechanisms to communicate with them, and tell them when their new product is coming out.” Within two years, the Apple CEO predicted, selling films “is going to get a lot more interesting, more precise, cheaper, efficient.”

Jobs’ vision is now being precisely played out by Mitch Lowe, CEO of MoviePass. MoviePass is the ONLY service that can deliver the exact value Jobs prescribed.

MoviePass know’s their customer, in a way studios have never known who their customers were before. MoviePass can deliver a precise, efficient, and cheaper mechanism to get butts into movie seats, previously unavailable to studio marketing chiefs. And yes, they can do it in a way that is more interesting and exciting to the coveted millennial audiences studios are desperate to connect with. Only MoviePass can tell studios exactly who is going to their movies, and reconnect them with sequels, sell them add on products and introduce them to similar films. And only MoviePass has the power to do this on their mobile app platform, knowing the precise history of the users previously viewed movies, locations and times.

Mitch Lowe stated in his interview with Peter Kafka of ReCode

“..we have all these different ways that we make your life better as a customer. We know how to market films to you. You know, the studios are incredibly inefficient the way they market small films. Over the last three weeks, we bought one in every 19 movie tickets in the country, but when we promote a film, we’re buying one in 10, so we’re lifting. These are for subjective $50 million box office films. The studios are paying us to be a more efficient marketer of films.”

MoviePass is a dream come true to Marketing executives who knowingly waste billions every year on big TV advertising binges trying to ensure that big budget films don’t go bust at the theater. An increasingly big risk in the crowded movie marketplace, that has been seeing reduced attendance. MoviePass stands to be the single best way to ensure that a movie does not fizzle out in the all important opening week.

According to Variety Magazine,

Marketers know the power of digital media, but also are becoming more cognizant of its limits. Several executives say they are not convinced, for example, that trailers posted online aren’t just as readily avoided by consumers as are TV ads skipped in the age of the DVR.

“You only know for sure that the consumer saw the first second or two of your trailer. After that, it’s unclear,” suggests a marketing consultant. “And was the volume even turned on? We don’t know. We need better verification of who is really watching and hearing what.

MoviePass – is similar to – but better- than Google keywords for movie studios.  MoviePass takes all the guesswork out of connecting directly with prospective theater goers by utilizing their deeply personal and engaging mobile platform. Simply put, there is no surer way for studios to drive customers to movies than using MoviePass as marketing partner.  If and when MoviePass hits their 5 Million subscriber goal they have predicted to hit by the end of this year, that power of connecting to large scale theater audiences only continues to grow.

It is important to note, that MoviePass has already been extremely successful extending out the all important opening week for many movies as of late.  CEO Mitch Lowe shares details in his interview with ReCode here.

In that same interview Lowe answers Kafka’s question of-

“What’s an example of a movie that the studios have paid you to promote?”

“I could list a bunch of them. “Maze Runner” is one over the last couple of weeks. “Lady Bird,” “I, Tonya,” almost every film …”

So it seems that MoviePass is already enjoying success promoting films for studios.  We don’t yet know how much those deals are earning MoviePass, and it has been reported in SEC filings that many of the deals are performance based.  Meaning that MoviePass gets paid and bonused on the number of actual tickets they help to sell.   We will find out soon how material this is to MoviePass earnings, but because MoviePass is still private, (HMNY) has no right or even any good reason to share these details.  I think we all may end up surprised by how big this advertising business can be.

MovieFone acquisition ups the anti on MoviePass advertising business potential.

When HMNY bought MovieFone – they upped the anti for their advertiser value proposition BIG TIME.  The addition of MovieFone brings MoviePass 6-8 Million additional monthly UU’s to market films to.  Taking the total addressable market for MoviePass advertisers to someplace near or above 10 Million people.  Additionally, the deal cut with Verizon to by MovieFone allowed for MoviePass to continue working with AOL’s Oath division for ad sales.  This is a big win for MoviePass because Oath has the largest display advertising salesforce in the business.  Oath sells ads for all AOL properties, Yahoo, and Microsoft.   This is a big benefit to a small company like MoviePass who would not be able to afford to build their own large salesforce early on.  Having worked in this space, I can tell you that getting a large company like Oath to agree to sell inventory for a small site is very hard to obtain.  When I was at Microsoft and we had a large ad salesforce, we were constantly asked by smaller partners to sell their inventory for them, but we would not do it because it created sales and channel conflicts for our own inventory.   This may sound like small details, but I can assure you this stuff is critical for building a large ad business.

It is estimated that as much 1/3 of revenue for a movie is achieved in the first week of a movie’s release, and further, it often can determine if an expensive film makes or loses money for the studio. This fact, along with tight windows that can’t be moved for movie release dates is what forces movie studio executives to spend $100’s of millions of dollars to “ensure success” of big budget films.

A quick look at the potential revenue MoviePass could score from this powerful marketing asset reveals a potential big windfall for HMNY the majority owner of MoviePass. It is easy to believe that when MoviePass hits its estimated 5 Million subscribers by the end of the year, they could nab a 10% share of total marketing spend, estimated at $2.36B. Or $230 Million in revenue conservatively estimated. MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe has previously estimated a potential of $6 Per Subscriber Per Month. Simple math of 5M Subscribers X $6 = $30 Million a month, or a yearly revenue run rate of $360 Million. This revenue source could easily be delivered at a Gross Margin in the 90% plus range.

(Source Variety.com)

Put simply, within 20 months, MoviePass + MovieFone has the potential to deliver a quarter billion dollars in run rate revenue from studio marketing budgets at incredible gross margins.

Remember, that Mitch Lowe, CEO of MoviePass has stated that the subscription business would run at breakeven at approximately 5 Million Subscribers.

My model shows that is indeed possible for MoviePass to breakeven or profit by next calendar year.

 

A Detailed Revenue Model On How The MoviePass Business Can Succeed

As a former GM of Product Management for Microsoft I spent countless hours creating and reviewing complicated revenue models for large scale businesses.  Revenue models bring together all of the various revenue opportunities a unit/company expects to see.  The model makes assumptions for every aspect of the business – pricing, sell through, inventory, growth rates, competition, conversion etc etc.   They are complicated beasts – so complicated in fact a model with just slightly different assumptions can create radially different results and viewpoints of a business’s feasibility .

At Microsoft revenue models typically have multiple reviews, every assumption is talked about, tested wherever possible, debated by the best and brightest at the company, and finally submitted to executive management. The models are then used for funding specific initiatives for things like headcount, marketing budgets and other costs related to executing against a business plan.  The revenue models are eventually used by the company to make estimates for Wall St. on future revenues and earnings.

I spent more than 20 years in the sausage factory where these models are created debated and reported.   I can tell you with certainty, these models consistently have less than 50% accuracy.  All models have politics, specific agendas and bias baked into them.  The truth in models is almost always somewhere in the middle of the most optimistic assumptions and the most negative assumptions.  It is important to know when reading any model, what is the agenda of the person who created that model?   Is he/she looking to secure funding?  Is the person looking to kill the business because they would prefer some other initiative to succeed?   What does a person have to gain or lose if their viewpoint of the model is accepted as the “truth”.    I have witnessed many a Machiavellian business leaders purposely input wildly implausible assumptions into models to serve their own purposes and to advance their own personal fortunes.  It happens all the time.

I felt like it was important for me to introduce a new revenue model for HMNY investors to consider as the only detailed model currently floating around the web is the one published from Mark Gomes.  Gomes has been a consistent basher of MoviePass stock, he spreads a message of fear uncertainty and doubt about the company.  He has maintained that the company will likely end up a penny stock based on the business model and the need for continued capital needs that will come from dilution at bad terms.   I have reviewed Mark’s model (link below) and I believe it is both flawed, and contains some radical assumptions that would not be accepted by any experienced product manager or finance executive who has actually worked on a product like MoviePass.

In my model for MoviePass  (Link Below) I show how MoviePass can achieve profitability by the end of the year, as predicted by Ted Farnsworth CEO of MoviePass multiple times in the past.   My assumptions are relatively conservative across the board, and they align to the major assumptions that have been shared from Mitch Lowe (CEO MoviePass) and Farnsworth and they are outlined in the notes of the shared spreadsheet.   To create the model it is necessary to pull together public comments from both of the key executives of the company, and to research other various sources.   It is no simple matter, but with some time and thought a reasonable view of the company can be put together.

I invite you to compare Mark Gome’s model with my own.  It may well be that the truth is somewhere in the middle.   I am as my readers know, very bullish on MoviePass, so my view may be too rose colored.   I can almost guarantee that Mark’s view is way too pessimistic.

Mark Gomes MoviePass Model

2 Major Assumptions from Mark’s MoviePass Model of where I disagree include:

  1. Mark has a very radical assumption in his last two months of 2018 where Utilization Rate (# of movie tickets per month per sub)  jumps to 3.7 in November 2018 and  4.1  in December 2018.   Mark does this to account for high movie going season.   That would be acceptable if he dropped the rates lower in other months, but he does not.  That is likely not at all a realistic view of utilization rate and is estimated super high to make the cash burn look way worse.  It also does not consider new moves by the company to limit number of movies view on the new plans.  Mark even admits in his model that he uses a number of movies seen that “makes no sense” but was offered by Mitch and Ted, so he uses it anyway.  Mark has conflated some very important things here.  Mitch and Ted were likely including the “halo” effect that MoviePass has, where people bring friends and family members who don’t have a MoviePass.  At any rate, Mark cherry picks number here to make things look way worse than they likely will be for his November and December estimates.
  2. Mark assumes an $11 dollar Movie Ticket Price.  That is way above the $9 ticket rate reported by industry metrics.

Mark and I are reasonably close on other assumptions.  That makes sense, because utilization rates and ticket price are clearly two of the biggest factors in the models.  I hold my utilization factor constant at 1.4 movies per month – less than the 1.2 factor often used by Mitch.  I don’t factor in big seasonality jumps simply to show a simpler model, and because I believe subscription users are less likely to be as seasonal as normal movie going audience.   This is something I can adjust for later on as I fine tune the model.

Here is a link to the model.   I welcome your feedback, comments and thoughts.   I will be adjusting the model regularly as new information come available.   In summary, my model shows it is very possible for MoviePass to breakeven on a yearly run rate basis by the end of the year.  Meaning they could breakeven in 2019.

Bob Visse’s MoviePass Model